Updated: 8:29 PM UTC, Jul 16, 2017

Fire Rainbows Are a Misnomer

You have surely seen a classic rainbow. But have you ever heard of a fire rainbow? They are neither fire nor rainbows, but are labelled as such because of their brilliant pastel colors and flame- like appearance.

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Do You Know the Difference Between Cyclones, Hurricanes and Typhoons?

Hurricanes, cyclones, and typhoons are all the same weather phenomenon; we just use different names for these storms in different locations. In the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, the term “hurricane” is used.

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Crooked Forest - Another Example of The Strange and Unexplained

There is a crooked forest in Western Poland where over 400 pine trees grow horizontally (90-degree bend at the base of their trunks). It seems like the trees grew normally for 7-10 years, then developed this curvature in the trunk structure.

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Foam Day Hits Australia - A Natural Phenomenon

This natural phenomenon is simply amazing: about once a year a veritable wall of sea foam, sometimes reaching heights up to 9 feet, smashes on to shore. In order for this freaky event to occur certain factors need to be present:  it's created by wind and waves churning up organic matter in the ocean. Decaying algae offshore are also often a major contributor.

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No Sex Life for Certain Fruit

Parthenocarpy (Latin for “maiden fruit”) refers to the development of fruit without fertilization. The process produces a sterile fruit which lacks seeds. This method of reproduction results in fruit that are clones of each other.

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Deceptive Plants Lure Unsuspecting Insects

To promote pollination, certain flowers attract insects by mimicking their sexual partners. In the case of orchids, the flower, by its color, furry body, and smell, mimics the female of a species of wasp.

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Do You Know How the Guinness Book Got Its Name?

The name of the Guinness Book originates from the beer of the same name. In 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, then the managing director of the Guinness Breweries, had an animated discussion with fellow hunters about the fastest game bird in Europe.

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So, Where Does An Alexandrine Come From?

In syllabic verse, such as that used in French literature, an alexandrine is a line of twelve syllables. There is some controversy as to the origin of the name, but most probably it is derived from a collection of Alexandrine romances, collected in the 12th century, of which Alexander the Great was the hero, written entirely in alexandrines.

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Rousseau, Renowned Author on Education Abandoned His Own Children

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, author of Émile, Or Treatise on Education admitted that he had placed his five children in an orphanage. Heavily criticized at the time, notably by Voltaire, he attempted to explain the situation in his celebrated autobiography The Confessions.

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Chuck Norris Sings His Way to Success

You surely know the series Walker, Texas Ranger, starring Chuck Norris as Cordell Walker. What you may not know is that Chuck Norris also sang the theme song of the series entitled "The Eyes Of The Ranger".

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Lavoisier, Persona Non Grata, During the Reign of Terror

Lavoisier, also known as The Father of Modern Chemistry, was guillotined on May 8, 1794 (during the Reign of Terror) in Paris, at the age of 50, along with his 27 co-defendants. Although widely circulated as being true (doubtful) Lavoisier apparently requested a 15 day stay of execution in order to finish his research.

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The Hidden Dangers of Cannonballs

During 18th-century naval battles it was not the cannonballs themselves that posed a danger, but the explosion of wood that occurred during the firing process. This process often resulted in injuries of the men on the bridge. In fact, cannonballs do not explode.

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